Categories: General
      Date: Apr 30, 2016
     Title: Primary Care Progress: Leadership Workshops Helping to Advance Health and Health Care

To kick-of the establishment of the new SLU Student Chapter of Primary Care Progress, the Center for Interprofessional Education and Research & SLU Department of Family and Community Medicine hosted workshops led by Andrew Morris-Singer, MD and Stephanie Nothelle, MD.  The Primary Care Progress pair came to the SLU IPE...


From Left to Right: Sarah Gebauer, MD; Stephanie Nothelle, MD, Andrew Morris-Singer, MD; Kristia Abernathy, (MS1); Robert James, (MS1), Amisha Patel (MS1), Emily Doucette, MD; David Pole PhD, MPH.

To kick-off the establishment of the new SLU Student Chapter of Primary Care Progress, the Center for Interprofessional Education and Research and the SLU Department of Family and Community Medicine hosted workshops led by Andrew Morris-Singer, MD and Stephanie Nothelle, MD. The Primary Care Progress pair came to the SLU IPE department during the last week in April to mentor our students and faculty on the leadership skills needed to advance health care in the new Primary Care Progress chapter.

These workshops explored a relational approach supporting the importance of transformation between health and health care. Participants engaged in an energized and interactive talk about the challenges around the “what” and the “how” of change as well as developing a sophisticated strategy for impacting the behavior and decisions of others.

Also, during the workshop, Drs. Morris-Singer and Nothelle showcased one of the main tools for a relational leader and the effective ways to use personal and patient narrative/storytelling. They discussed how these skills could be used at the new SLU Student Chapter of Primary Care Progress to help build strong teams, connect with diverse stakeholders, and motivate others to work at the top of their skill set.

A popular topic addressed was the advancement of interprofessionalism and care for our most complex patients. Participants were asked to discuss the benefit for patients to have a comprehensive team of health care providers who are engaged in collaborative care. Participants learned how to dig deeper to understand social determinants and how these may impact uncontrolled chronic health issues - the driving factors of health care utilization.

Dr. Stephanie Nothelle discussing the importance of developing a personal narrative. Drs. Morris-Singer and Nothelle are with the national Primary Care Progress Organization, student leaders of the SLU PCP Student Chapter, and SLU faculty advisers for the PCP Chapter.

Dr. Morris-Singer, board certified in internal medicine, is President and Founder of Primary Care Progress (PCP), a clinician, a medical educator, and primary care advocate. He founded PCP in 2010 which quickly developed into an interprofessional, trainee-led, grassroots movement to reform primary care delivery and training having chapters at 30 medical schools nationally.

Dr. Stephanie Nothelle is a post-doctoral fellow in Geriatric Medicine at Johns Hopkins and a member of the national coaching/training team at Primary Care Progress. She trained in Primary Care - Internal Medicine and was a chief resident at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center where she was a leader in a resident led hot-spotting initiative called the Bayview Patient Connection.

To learn more about Primary Care Progress, please visit www.primarycareprogress.org. For more information about this event and future IPE workshops, follow the Center for IPE on Facebook and/or Twitter.